Stephanie Wellford

Senior Project Manager

Stephanie Wellford

Stephanie Wellford

Senior Project Manager

Ms. Stephanie Wellford has more than a decade of experience leading multi-center observational, mechanistic, Phase 2 and Phase 3 clinical trials with a focus on programs funded through BARDA, NIH, and NIAID.

Currently, Ms. Wellford is leading Rho’s efforts to coordinate and support the NIH-funded Human Epidemiology and Response to SARS-CoV-2 (HEROS) study, which will help determine the rate of novel coronavirus infection in children and their family members. The HEROS study is breaking new ground in conducting virtual trials by allowing subjects to complete the study almost entirely from home. Under Ms. Wellford’s leadership, Rho was able to get the study started quickly and within only one month, the Rho team trained all Rho staff members, finalized training materials for families taking samples at home, and secured masks and other needed supplies which were in very high demand.

Ms. Wellford also has expertise in BARDA-sponsored vaccine studies. Most recently, she served as the project lead for a study to investigate the safety and immunogenicity of an anthrax vaccine in individuals over 65. Her familiarity with the priorities, personnel, processes, and vendors that drive BARDA’s medical countermeasures research allows her to provide quality support and guidance in alignment with BARDA’s preferences for study conduct.

Having performed numerous roles in clinical trial operations and management, including onsite clinical monitor, clinical team lead, and project lead, Ms. Wellford is a well-seasoned project lead. Her expertise in project management and clinical operations provides a distinctive perspective to clients and ensures high-quality clinical trials in complex therapeutic areas.

Ms. Wellford received her bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has co-authored and presented numerous posters at SCT and SoCRA annual conferences.

Why clinical research?

“Clinical research is somewhat of an unknown space to the general public. I, like many people, did not fully understand what clinical research entailed. I never stopped to think how drugs are approved or how we learn more about diseases. As I researched and learned more about the clinical research world, I was immediately intrigued by the complex processes of drug development and approval, and most importantly, the impacts clinical research makes on the world. It has been a great fit for me since my interests have always been in medicine and health (my childhood career aspirations were to become a doctor), but my skills were better suited for project management!”

This is what drives Stephanie:

“I had an “ah-ha” moment of what makes what we do “worth it” during an onsite monitoring visit early in my career. I exited the elevator and walked into the site team offices as I usually do, but this time I found hand-colored pictures and notes from study participants displayed on the wall. In 7 or 8-year old scribble, I read something along the lines of “thank you for making my asthma better.” This child’s note has stuck with me and is always a reminder of how we are changing lives every day.”