Amanda Farrell

Senior Project Manager

Amanda Farrell

Senior Project Manager

A swiss army knife of sorts, when it comes to clinical operations and project management, Amanda Farrell can and has done it all. With a strong focus on asthma and allergy indications, she has more than seven years of experience leading all phases of clinical trials.

During her tenure at Rho, Ms. Farrell continues to prove her keen ability to build strong relationships with her asthma and allergy counterparts at DAIT, consortia leadership centers, investigative sites and external vendors in the respiratory disease space. A well-seasoned project leader, Ms. Farrell has worn a multitude of hats in clinical trial operations and management – including onsite clinical monitor, clinical team lead and project lead. Her expertise in project management and clinical operations provides a distinctive perspective to clients and ensures high-quality clinical trials in complex therapeutic areas.

Currently, Ms. Farrell serves as project lead for the Asthma and Allergy Disease Group within the NIAID Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation (DAIT) Statistical and Clinical Coordinating Center.

Additionally, she serves as the clinical operations management lead of the disease group. As the clinical operations functional lead, Ms. Farrell is responsible for overseeing a team of clinical research associates, the performance of clinical operations activities, as well as metric tracking and timeline management. Ms. Farrell has also served as the lead project manager of clinical trials for the NIAID-funded Inner-City Asthma Consortium (ICAC), Consortium for Food Allergy Research (CoFAR), and Atopic Dermatitis Research Network (ADRN).

Ms. Farrell received her bachelor’s degree in biology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, her master’s degree in biology from Mississippi College, and has co-authored and presented multiple posters at SCT and SoCRA annual conferences.

Why Respiratory?

“While I have been fortunate to not be personally affected by respiratory diseases, I have watched my immediate family members struggle with respiratory disease. My brother (who is only 15 months younger than me) had asthma from a very young age and I am well versed in the nebulizer treatments and importance of always having an inhaler. In adulthood, my mother was also diagnosed with asthma and has frequent flare ups that require treatment with steroids. My grandmother also has asthma and COPD and I’ve seen her in the hospital numerous times. I’m grateful to work in a field of research that not only hits close to home but can benefit the many people who suffer from respiratory diseases.”

This is what drives Amanda:

“While I love the project management aspect of my work, what really drives me comes from my clinical operations experience. Having the opportunity to visit the research sites and interact with the site staff who are on the front lines of this research every day really gives our work a whole new perspective. I’ve also had the opportunity to observe study visits and interact with some of the families participating in our research. Being able to see first-hand the benefits of our research is truly rewarding.”